Read the full article by Sasha Lekach at mashable.com

Enough is enough when it comes to posting explicit content, like photos or videos with nudity, without consent.

The practice, known as “revenge porn” or “sextortion,” has been in the spotlight recently due to high-profile cases involving celebrities, such as Mischa Barton and Blac Chyna, but it doesn’t just hurt victims in the public eye.

Yet there’s no federal law that protects victims whose private images have been exploited online. What victims are left with is a patchwork of laws across 35 states, and legal hurdles if their perpetrators cross state lines.

A bipartisan group of U.S. senators including Kamala Harris, who fought against revenge porn as California’s attorney general, Richard Burr, and Amy Klobuchar want to change that. They introduced legislation Tuesday morning that would make revenge porn a federal crime, with a punishment of up to five years behind bars, an undisclosed fine, or both.

The proposed ENOUGH Act — or the Ending Nonconsensual Online User Graphic Harassment — aims to give the Department of Justice a tool to treat nonconsensual porn postings as a criminal offense.

 

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