Read the full article by Amelia McDonell-Parry at RollingStone.com

Actress Lenna Lux claims that Riley Reynolds, who appeared in the 2015 doc ‘Hot Girls Wanted,’ was not properly licensed to work as her agent in Florida

In Netflix’s 2015 documentary, Hot Girls Wanted, Riley Reynolds, now 29, was portrayed as a clean cut, business-minded alternative to the sleazy porn agent stereotype, taking young amateur hopefuls under his wing, moving them into South Florida “model apartments” and guiding their careers through his talent agency, Hussie Models LLC. Sure, Reynolds had a preference for young-looking “teeny boppers,” and predicted the talent pool would never dry up, since “everyday another girl turns 18”; but overall, he came across in the movie as a likeable entrepreneur working hard on behalf of his clients. One critic even described Reynolds as “less as a porn Svengali and more as a den father of sorts.”

Not according to adult film actress Lenna Lux, he isn’t. Lux has filed a lawsuit against Reynolds accusing him of lying about his credentials for the last three years, and despite claiming to be a licensed and bonded talent agent, he has never been authorized to work as an agent in Florida.

The Daily Beast confirmed that, according to the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Reynolds and Hussie Models LLC have never been licensed in the state of Florida. While Reynolds applied for a license in 2016, he was rejected because of his “alleged criminal record indicating moral turpitude and/or dishonest dealings,” and the court rejected his appeal of the ruling in March 2018.

According to the State of California’s talent agency license database, Hussie Models LLC is currently licensed until April 2019. But regardless, being licensed in one state doesn’t allow Reynolds to operate in another state, especially when that state has recently doubled down on rejecting his application. And with Netflix’s Hot Girls Wanted documentary readily available to corroborate that Hussie Models LLC was doing significant business in Florida, Reynolds would have a difficult time arguing that Lux, as a Florida-based client, was an outlier.